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Natural Awakenings Northwest Florida

Tapping the Mind’s Hidden Power with Hypnosis

Nov 04, 2012 11:17PM ● By Maia Rizzi

 

Many people believe that we are moving toward a new frontier of consciousness that will allow us to rediscover and redefine who we are and just what we are capable of achieving. This second Renaissance is one of the heart and mind, a rebirthing of the innate powers we all possess, but have forgotten over time. We each have a storehouse of potential energy that can be activated through hypnosis.

Sports teams and Olympian athletes practice hypnosis and counselors and psychiatrists employ it. Now it is being used in the medical field.

Hypnosis has been researched and validated in such prestigious hospitals, universities and institutions as The Mayo Clinic, the National Institutes of Health, Stanford University, Columbia University and others.

People like Candace Pert Ph.D., a professor at the Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience and Rutgers University, and Dr. David Felten, M.D., Ph.D., a professor of neurobiology and anatomy at the University of Rochester School of Medicine, have done extensive research that supports the assertion that the chemicals in our system form a dynamic information network, linking our minds and bodies—literally, a bodymind.

The mind is divided into two sections—the conscious mind and the subconscious mind. The conscious mind is comprised mostly of our thoughts, wishes, daydreams and preoccupations. It uses logic and rational deduction to make decisions and judgments. The subconscious lies deeper and uses programming received over a lifetime to create emotions. Using hypnosis, this programming can be overridden, rechanneled and refocused into a more positive expression.

Because our minds and bodies are so connected, that opens the door for us to use hypnosis as a modality to assist modern medicine. In fact, hypnosis is often used prior to surgery, because it has been shown to decrease the amount of anesthesia needed, lower blood pressure, lessen blood loss, facilitate healing and help calm patients’ fears. Hypnosis has also had considerable success with migraine headaches and many forms of chronic pain.

Maia Rizzi is a nationally certified clinical hypnotherapist and founder of Breakthrough Hypnotherapy. Contact her at 850-291-2081.

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